Single push-pull amplifier with cross over compensation

This is just going to be a quick one. Double push-pull amplifier with cross over compensation explained a high-power amplifier circuit which creates a balance point and corrects for cross over. A much simpler version of the circuit depends on two equal voltage sources creating that 0V balance point, so it used a single push-pull … Continue reading Single push-pull amplifier with cross over compensation

Double push-pull amplifier with cross over compensation

Push-pull amplifiers [1] are great for driving heavy loads because they divide work among two transistors and produce a centred output signal that can freely move up or down around the centre. Simple push-pull amplifier When powering the amplifier with a single power source (eg. a 12V battery), then the output signal oscillates around half … Continue reading Double push-pull amplifier with cross over compensation

Transistor Common Base Configuration – a Hidden Champion

The transistor common base configuration is just as simple as the other two (common collector, common emitter) configurations, but far less known and used - which is a regrettable mistake, because it is absolutely awesome and has little-known characteristics which we'll look into right away! Common base configuration Operating principle At first look, the common … Continue reading Transistor Common Base Configuration – a Hidden Champion

The improved differential amplifier (based on current mirror)

This circuit is an improved version of the differential amplifier built with a current mirror from last year. The previous circuit suffered from a design flaw which I realised only when trying to actually build the circuit with hardware: the collector resistors are way too small (actually 0Ω) for a sensitive circuit. The current going … Continue reading The improved differential amplifier (based on current mirror)